Month: July 2014

“The End of Poverty?”– The Problem Persists

Global poverty did not just happen. Yet the overwhelming magnitude of poverty seems unsolvable.  Can we really end poverty within our current economic system? In this award-winning documentary, narrated by Martin Sheen, we see the historical foundation that, for over five centuries,  laid the groundwork for today’s financial crisis.  It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization (often in the spirit of missionary zeal) that resulted in the seizure of land and  minerals and in forced labor. Today, the problem persists because of the structuring of debt, trade and tax policies. ...

Continue reading

“The Fall” (mini-series) — “Prime Suspect” Revisited

In this Netflix Original production distributed by BBC Ireland, (not to be confused with the 2006 movie of the same name–see August 16, 2011 review),  the story unfolds, not as a mystery to be solved, but as a contrast between two obsessive personality types. One is Detective Stella Gibson (Gillian Anderson of “X-Files” and “Bleak House” fame), called in to solve a murder.  The other is the psychopath leading a double life, not unlike “Dexter”. Interestingly, it is the seeming normalcy of the psychopath, Paul Spector (Jamie Dornan, soon to be  known...

Continue reading

Green Chalk Contemporary–It’s All About Fish

The year-old gallery, Green Chalk Contemporary,  in Monterey, is currently presenting “FRESH FISH “, a show of  over 50  artworks  contributed by local, national and international artists.  Emotionally resonant subject matter, expressive brushwork, vibrant colors, deep and rich paint and ink tones, mixed media, found objects and industrial materials all are evident in eclectic compositions.  Squid ink, seaweed, threads, epoxy and glass, and dried anchovies screamed out “FISH.” This exhibit ( part of the Lighthouse District’s Big Splash” events going on in...

Continue reading

“The Lunchbox”–Tidbits of Love

    This 2014 Indian film is  a quirky romantic tale of two very lonely and desperate people attempting to find something to live for.  A psychological study of loneliness and hope, “The Lunchbox” masterfully questions how much an individual is willing to risk to change his or her life. Saajan Fernandes is a fifty-something civil servant on the cusp of retirement and  resentful about it.  Long a widower, his life is now empty as he coldly but minimally interacts with others:   the children in his apartment complex to the young man assigned to be trained as his replacement. ...

Continue reading

Subscribe to my Newsletter

* indicates required
Jul0 Posts
Aug0 Posts
Sep0 Posts
Oct0 Posts
Nov0 Posts
Dec0 Posts
Jan0 Posts
Feb0 Posts
Mar0 Posts
Apr0 Posts
May0 Posts
Jun0 Posts
Jul0 Posts
Aug0 Posts
Sep0 Posts
Oct0 Posts