“Skeleton Twins” — A Second Chance

 

[Guest blogger Anthony Berteaux is a sophomore at San Diego State University majoring in drama and journalism. He writes a column for The Daily Aztec, (an independent campus newspaper) and his most recent article is “Die-in Protests Fuel the Fire”.]

Skeleton Twins

 

The best kinds of love stories are the ones that aren’t romantic and some can hit a nerve. In a culture of Nicholas Sparks, it is easy to forget that love stories aren’t just limited to romantic relationships, but encompass any authentic and special bond with someone else, whether it is a pet, a cousin or a friend.   The most powerful love stories can be the ones we share with family.

This is where the “Skeleton Twins”, directed by Craig Johnson and powerfully acted by former SNL regulars Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader, succeeds in recognizing familial relationships may be the most complex and emotionally resonant stories we can tell.

Wiig and Hader play Maggie and Milo, estranged twins, who begin living together after Milo attempts suicide.  Maggie is his only personal contact. Milo is a struggling gay actor and Maggie feels trapped in a happy marriage. They’re both cynical, somber and suicidal and it becomes clearer as the movie progresses that these twins are equally lost but need each other. They’ve spent ten years apart, but their struggles are analogous.

There’s a plot involving Maggie’s husband, a previous family suicide, Milo’s romantic past, and the siblings’ broken relationships with their parents. While Hader and Wiig look nothing like twins, there’s a chemistry there that isn’t just limited to comedy. They’re a tag team, competing and feeding off each other’s energies without being overwhelmed by the other.

This is a comedic movie, however, that doesn’t negate the very dark tone that comes with a theme like suicide. If you’re looking for a light comedy, this isn’t it.  This film reveals a dark sense of humor, not the type that we usually associate with Hader and Wiig. Again, it’s fascinating to witness the evolution of Hader, who pulls off dramatic even better than he does comedic roles. Perhaps, what the world lost in the genius Robin Williams, we can regain in some form in the gifts of Wiig and Hader.

“Skeleton Twins” is a truly honest potrayal of a powerful love shared between siblings. They are tethered by something larger than themselves. They may fight and bicker, but in the end, love prevails. The film demonstrates blood is thicker than water, for better and for worse.

 

 

One comment on ““Skeleton Twins” — A Second Chance

  1. Nice review. I really wasn’t very interested in seeing this movie, but this review made me think it would be worth seeing on the big screen, rather than waiting for it on Netflix.

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