“Bordertown”– New Boundaries in Scandinavian Noir

Bordertown Netflix original

Bordertown (Sojornen)

You can escape the big city and its frenetic fierceness, but you can’t escape murder, not even in the hinterland of Finland. That’s the psychologically disturbing theme in Bordertown, Netflix’s latest international acquisition and the latest Scandinavian Noir drama that’s sure to mesmerize audiences.

Bordertown is also a drama about family in which crime disrupts and plagues the family’s attempts at intimacy and communication.

The main character, Detective Kari Sorjonen, decides he needs to leave the horrors of urban crime for a slower pace, moving his wife and teenage daughter to his wife’s hometown bordering St. Petersburg. Looking for balance between family and work, Sorjonen soon finds himself in the midst of a disturbing investigation tangentially linking the brutal murders of teenage girls to his own family.

The brooding, dark environment –like all great Nordic Noir —underscores the underbelly of nasty psychopaths and their heinous crimes. In Bordertown almost all of the horror involves teenage girls–but the main plot which carries emotional weight throughout the series is that Kari Sorjonen just wants to have dinner with his family without being called away to another brutal murder scene. The fact that his daughter is the same age as the victims overwhelms and drives Sorjonen to maniacally solve each crime.

Sorjonen, as a savant with picture-perfect photographic memory, literally constructs memory palaces with masking tape laid out on the floor. Dysfunctional and deeply flawed in many ways (like Sherlock Holmes, Adrian Monk, and the autistic female detective in each of three adaptations of Brön or The Bridge), Sorjonen is a brilliant crime solver.

If you’re looking for a new heart-pounding crime drama series with one crime solved in two or three succeeding episodes (“Doll’s House, Parts 1, 2 and 3; then “Dragonflies”, Parts 1 and 2), then this is a great option. You can binge view until the crime is solved, three hours of viewing max, before moving on to the next murder.

I’ve got six more episodes to go!

Note: Bordertown‘s series premiere in Finland (October 2016) drew a record 1.1 million viewers, which is roughly a fifth of the country’s population.

3 comments on ““Bordertown”– New Boundaries in Scandinavian Noir

  1. We just viewed the first episode(s) of this remarkable series.
    We thought we’d just view the first episode, then moved on to the next one and then finally had to sit for another hour to find out what/how the “case” turns out as well as learning more about this Kari Sorjonen and his family.
    An engaging and interesting study of how the mind works in exceptional people and the people who love them.

  2. While I agree with Lenore in that violence can sometimes turn me off I’m such a fan of Nordic films that I accept more violence than I normally would in say, an American film.

    That said, I *had* to recommend, Trapped a series about a detective trying to solve a case while trapped in Iceland during a snow storm. If you like depth of character, a strong sense of place, and a clever storyline with very little violence, you’ll probably like Trapped.

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