Hi from Ojai!

Ojai

We are always looking for a mini-vacation no more than four or five hours drive from Monterey. Several weeks ago we had the wonderful experience of staying at the historic Ojai Valley Inn and Spa, a glorious oasis directly east of Ventura. The wonderful climate of the Ojai Valley draws celebrities and regular folk to  rejuvenate their health in a sanctuary of tranquility at the spa or on the vast grounds where tropical birds in large cages talk to you in hilarious repetitions of whatever you say.

The trails –especially the Pratt Loop–are easy and long, with sweeping vistas of the valley below.  Along the well-maintained trails we picked avocadoes and oranges that drooped  from orchards nearby. Surrounded by hills and mountains, the Ojai Valley Inn celebrates the “Pink Moment” when the sunset casts a pink glow onto the hillside for all to enjoy while drinking a glass of wine from one of the Ojai Valley vineyards.

Although we were at the Inn during the “low season” the concierge service was truly imaginative and helpful.  We were able to take an acrylic painting class at the dedicated “Artist Cottage”.  Ojai does indeed nurture its art and artists with the  Ojai Center for the Arts, downtown galleries featuring both local and international artists, Ojai Studio Artists Tour and Art in the Park. Artist Cottage

A combination of art and wine can be seen on the  side streets and fine restaurants are scattered throughout.   In addition, there are many annual events like the Ojai Film Festival,  a cineaste’s destination (every November).

One of our most enjoyable activities was a private cooking class arranged through PalatePro in the back kitchen of Azu, a Spanish tapas restaurant.  We were lucky to be their first students. Chef Chris supervised our preparation of dates wrapped in bacon and stuffed with chorizo, brie drizzled with honey,  sautéed scallops with lemon and capers, spicy mussels,  kale Caesar salad with polenta croutons, filet tacos, and a pear tart all served in a private dining room. I’ll be posting some food photos soon! Azu was a blast.   Keep that in mind in light of my warning below.  I highly recommend Ojai as a retreat away from home, so close and yet a world away!  One note of caution:  Do NOT go to the hotel restaurant at the Ojai Valley Inn when the chef has his days off (Mondays and Tuesdays).  The food was terrible!

 

Napa Valley Film Festival–Is this the next Sundance?

Last week (November 9-13) I attended the inaugural Napa Valley Film Festival (NVFF) with a friend who lives in Calistoga and has volunteered in the festival’s planning.  Over 100 films were presented, many for the first time at any film festival, in 12 screening locations from Napa to Calistoga.  Along with viewing films we had the  pleasure of tasting fine wines from local wineries and delicious food at the welcome party (for holders of Pass Plus and patrons).  In the next two or three posts, I will be reviewing several of my favorite movies from NVFF.

While this year marks the 30th anniversary of Sundance,  walking through the Napa Valley circuit of theaters I kept imagining that Sundance was probably a lot like this in 1981, except for subzero temperatures and a smaller geographical area to maneuver.  Since my friend Caroline and I had been to Sundance several times, we had the experience to compare both festivals.  First of all, for those who prefer the autumn splendor of colored leaves, hills, and vines, Napa Valley is incomparable.  The rugged beauty of Park City, Utah definitely has its merits–especially for skiers–but the subzero weather makes long outdoor lines a form of human torture.

Second, the novelty of the film festival in the Napa area resulted in great flexibility among the friendly volunteers in greeting attendees, guiding them to the complimentary wine tables, and allowing the two of us into the theater after the first minutes of the movie’s showing.  Sundance would never let us do that!  We were quiet and moved stealthily to seats in the back near an exit.  Never an option at Sundance.

The films were overall of high quality with some first runs–“J. Edgar”, “The Descendants”, “Butter”, and “Hideaway”–all produced by major production studios.  Several of the indies were charming and original–“Becoming Santa”, about the history of Santa Claus and the training of Santas at a special school, “Jiro Makes Sushi”, about an 85-year old master chef in Tokyo’s only 3-star Michelin restaurant, and “Mamitas”, a coming-of-age film about two Mexican-American teenagers in Los Angeles.  The editing, sometimes a lack of subtitles, and infrequently amateurish cinematography in a scene or two marred some of the indie films we saw. As word gets out, however, there should be a broader selection of fine films to choose from.

There were perhaps two major indicators that the NVFF is just beginning its journey to being a major player in the long list of film festivals across the country.  One is the lack of adequate signage for finding some venues (Elementary School and Gliderport in Calistoga, for example), where anyone but locals would not be able to find the location.  Even my friend hesitated in finding the driveway for the Gliderport venue.  The second indicator was the absence of a shuttle bus system to transport attendees from one theater to another, and some were at least 45-minutes apart from point-to-point (Calistoga to Napa).  While over half of the attendees were locals this year, that will definitely change as the word gets out that this film festival means business about being ranked in the top ten nationally.  With the food (Zuzu, Market, Azzurro, Oxbow Market, Jole) and the wine (unique in comparison with Sundance), the Napa Valley Film Festival is definitely a contender for being a knockout star among film festivals going forward!  Check out their excellent website at: www.napavalleyfilmfest.org. (Sundance could learn some lessons in this department from Napa!)